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Home : College of Humanities and Social Science : School of Social and Political Science (Schedule J) : Postgraduate (School of Social and Political Science)

An Introduction to Anthropological Theory (P00668)

? Credit Points : 20  ? SCQF Level : 11  ? Acronym : SPS-P-ANTHEOR

This course is not designed to present a complete history of the various theoretical developments or debates within anthropology. Instead, organized around a contrast between anthropologists who place the emphasis on 'society' and anthropologists who stress the importance of 'culture', it aims to provide an intensive introduction to some of the most important theoretical perspectives and to show the ways in which they have been used in explaining social and cultural processes among particular peoples. Utilizing a number of fieldwork studies, both 'classic' and more recent, it also focuses on the intimate link between theory and ethnography, and attempts to elucidate the distinctive character of social anthropology: the questions it asks and the answers it supplies.

Entry Requirements

none

Subject Areas

Delivery Information

? Normal year taken : Postgraduate

? Delivery Period : Semester 1 (Blocks 1-2)

? Contact Teaching Time : 2 hour(s) per week for 10 weeks

First Class Information

Date Start End Room Area Additional Information
22/09/2009 14:00 16:00 Seminar Room 6, Chrystal Macmillan Building Central

Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should have a clear overview of the main anthropological theories and a critical appreciation of their 'place' within social anthropology. In addition, having explored a variety of ethnographies, they should be able to reflect on the possible application of these theories to different ethnographic problems. Above all, having engaged with the kind of questions anthropologists ask and some of the answers they offer, students should have an advanced understanding of the anthropological 'mode of thought' and its intrinsic connection with the methodological challenges embedded in ethnographic enquiry.

Assessment Information

(i) 1 long essay (4000 words) worth 80% of the available marks
(ii) 1 short written assignment (max. 1500 words) worth 20% of the available marks

Contact and Further Information

The Course Secretary should be the first point of contact for all enquiries.

Course Secretary

Miss Caroline Foord
Tel : (0131 6)51 1560
Email : Caroline.foord@ed.ac.uk

Course Organiser

Dr Dimitri Tsintjilonis
Tel : (0131 6)50 3934
Email : D.Tsintjilonis@ed.ac.uk

School Website : http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/

College Website : http://www.hss.ed.ac.uk/

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