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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2013/2014 -
- ARCHIVE as at 1 September 2013 for reference only
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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences : Lifelong Learning (PPL)

Undergraduate Course: Moral Philosophy (LLLI07005)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Course typeStandard AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 7 (Year 1 Undergraduate) Credits10
Home subject areaLifelong Learning (PPL) Other subject areaNone
Course website None Taught in Gaelic?No
Course descriptionThis is a for-credit course offered by the Office of Lifelong Learning (OLL); only students registered with OLL should be enrolled. A historical survey of the key moral thinkers and their theories, from the ancient Greeks to the present day. Extracts from classic texts will be studied, and placed in their historical and philosophical contexts.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Additional Costs None
Course Delivery Information
Delivery period: 2013/14 Lifelong Learning - Session 1, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Learn enabled:  No Quota:  10
Web Timetable Web Timetable
Course Start Date 23/09/2013
Breakdown of Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 100 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 20, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 2, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 78 )
Additional Notes
Breakdown of Assessment Methods (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
No Exam Information
Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
┐ Read and critically evaluate a philosopher┐s argument;
┐ Explain the central elements in a range of moral theoretical positions;
┐ Identify the historical and philosophical significance of these positions.
Assessment Information
Open Studies 10 credit courses have one assessment. Normally, the assessment is a 2000 word essay, worth 100% of the total mark, submitted by week 12. To pass, students must achieve a minimum of 40%. There are a small number of exceptions to this model which are identified in the Studying for Credit Guide.
Special Arrangements
None
Additional Information
Academic description Not entered
Syllabus Content of course
1. Introduction - what is moral theory, and how did it begin?
2. Virtue ethics - Aristotle┐s Nicomachean Ethics.
3. Egoism - Hobbes┐ Leviathan.
4. Egoism ┐ Hume┐s response.
5. Utilitarianism ┐ Bentham and Mill
6. Deontology ┐ Kant┐s Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals.
7. Intuitionism ┐ Ross: The Right and the Good.
8. Justice ┐ Rawls.
9. Rights ┐ Nozick: Anarchy State and Utopia.
10. Relativism.
Transferable skills Not entered
Reading list Essential
Singer, P., ed., 1993. A Companion to Ethics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Recommended
Rachels, J., 2007. The Elements of Moral Philosophy. 5th ed. Boston; London: McGraw Hill.
Benn, P., 2002. Ethics. London: Routledge.
Web sources
John Gordon┐s website: http://www.glaucon.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk
Class handouts
Handouts will be made available on a weekly basis.
Study Abroad Not entered
Study Pattern Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserMr James Mooney
Tel: (0131 6)50 3077
Email: james.mooney@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Diane Mcmillan
Tel: (0131 6)50 6912
Email: D.McMillan@ed.ac.uk
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