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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2013/2014 -
- ARCHIVE as at 1 September 2013 for reference only
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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Postgraduate (History, Classics and Archaeology)

Postgraduate Course: Space, Place and Movement in the Making of Slave Societies: Brazil, Cuba, the US and the The Atlantic World, 1791-1888 (PGHC11363)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Course typeStandard AvailabilityAvailable to all students
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) Credits20
Home subject areaPostgraduate (History, Classics and Archaeology) Other subject areaNone
Course website None Taught in Gaelic?No
Course descriptionThis course uses the theme of movement, space and place as a window onto the comparative social, political and economic history of Atlantic slave societies. One of the defining elements of enslavement was the lack of the right to control one┐s own movements; at the same time, Atlantic slavery involved the greatest forced movement of human beings in modern history. Geographical knowledge and human movement were tools for the structuring of colonial and post-colonial slave societies, polities and economies, but they also became a means by which such projects might be subverted, not least by the enslaved themselves. After introducing some key concepts and ideas, the course begins with an overview of the dynamics of slave trading in the making of an "Atlantic World" and the states and societies that composed it. Subsequent thematic weeks consider the role of human movement in a series of key areas: the creation of new societies and cultural mixtures in the Americas; the central importance of gender in shaping slaves┐ approach to space, place, and "resistance"; war and rebellions in the Atlantic World; and the movements of ideas, as well as people, in formulating abolitionist movements and arguments. The course then considers some of these themes in greater depth through three specific nineteenth-century case studies: Brazil, Cuba, and the United States. The final week draws comparative conclusions and considers post-emancipation responses.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Additional Costs None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
Displayed in Visiting Students Prospectus?No
Course Delivery Information
Delivery period: 2013/14 Semester 1, Available to all students (SV1) Learn enabled:  Yes Quota:  None
Location Activity Description Weeks Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
CentralSeminarRm G.09, William Robertson Wing1-11 11:10 - 13:00
First Class First class information not currently available
No Exam Information
Summary of Intended Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the course will be able to demonstrate:
- A thorough understanding of broad themes and historiographical debates in the comparative study of Atlantic slave societies
- An advanced understanding of three main slave societies of the nineteenth century: Brazil, Cuba, United States
- An advanced ability to distinguish between the general and the particular
- Advanced skills in critical evaluation of secondary and primary materials
- Advanced discussion and group presentation skills
- Advanced research and writing skills.
Assessment Information
One 3,000-word essay.
Special Arrangements
None
Additional Information
Academic description Not entered
Syllabus Not entered
Transferable skills Not entered
Reading list Not entered
Study Abroad Not entered
Study Pattern Not entered
KeywordsSpacePlaceMovement Slave Societies Brazil Cuba US
Contacts
Course organiserDr Camillia Cowling
Tel: (0131 6)50 3472
Email: camillia.cowling@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Lindsay Scott
Tel: (0131 6)50 9948
Email: Lindsay.Scott@ed.ac.uk
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© Copyright 2013 The University of Edinburgh - 14 March 2013 4:41 am