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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Archaeology

Undergraduate Course: Rock Art and Archaeology: from Scotland to the Sahara (ARCA10073)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 3 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course will focus on prehistoric rock art and the role it plays in society, both past and present. It will examine how we define, analyse and interpret rock art, and consider contemporary issues of conservation, management and presentation.

The majority of the course will deal with the methodological and theoretical approaches that have been used in the study of rock art, and how these have influenced our changing perceptions of its meaning and value. Students will be made aware of the almost global occurrence of prehistoric paintings and engravings, but concentrate specifically on those in Europe and Africa from the Palaeolithic to the Iron Age.

The final part of the course considers rock art as an archaeological resource with reference to such issues as conservation, management and the implications of public access and use.
Course description Not entered
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements Pre-requisites: Archaeology 2A and 2B, or Honours entry to degrees in Classics, or equivalent.
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesVisiting students should have at least 3 Archaeology courses at grade B or above (or be predicted to obtain this). We will only consider University/College level courses.
Course Delivery Information
Not being delivered
Learning Outcomes
Students who complete the course successfully will be able by the end of the course to demonstrate in written examination and course work as well as in class discussion:
The methodological and theoretical approaches used to study prehistoric rock art and how these have altered our perspective through time
A globally orientated view of rock art and rock art studies
The key arguments relating to the ethnography of rock art
The different contexts in which rock art was created and used
The role of rock art as a cultural and archaeological resource
The issues surrounding the treatment and use of rock art today

Transferable Skills:
Students will also demonstrate that they can:
gather material independently on a given topic and organise it into a coherent data set;
compare differing sets of data from varying situations and draw conclusions from them;
evaluate different approaches to and explanations of material, and make critical choices between them;
express clearly ideas and arguments, both orally and in writing;
organise complex and lengthy sets of arguments and draw these together into a coherent conclusion;
organise their own learning, manage their workload and work to a timetable
Reading List
None
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiser Course secretaryMs Amanda Campbell
Tel: (0131 6)50 3782
Email: amanda.campbell@ed.ac.uk
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