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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2014/2015
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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences : Lifelong Learning (PPL)

Undergraduate Course: Philosophy of Art (LLLI07006)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 7 (Year 1 Undergraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits10 ECTS Credits5
SummaryA historical approach to the philosophical problems which are presented by art: its production and its appreciation. Commencing with the ancient Greeks, the course proceeds, via the 18th and 19th centuries, to key 20th-century ideas on the nature and role of art.
Course description Content of course
1. Plato's Republic Book X
2. Aristotle's Poetics
3. Hutcheson's An Inquiry Concerning Beauty, Order, Harmony, Design.
4. Hume's Essay on the Standard of Taste
5. Kant's Critique of Judgement.
6. Schopenhauer: Parerga and Paralipomena
7. Nietzsche: Birth of Tragedy.
8. Tolstoy: What is Art?
9. Sartre: The Psychology of the Imagination.
10. Barthes: The Death of the Author.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2014/15, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  10
Course Start Lifelong Learning - Session 3
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 100 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 20, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 2, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 78 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Open Studies 10 credit courses have one assessment. Normally, the assessment is a 2000 word essay, worth 100% of the total mark, submitted by week 12. To pass, students must achieve a minimum of 40%. There are a small number of exceptions to this model which are identified in the Studying for Credit Guide.
Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
Students will be able:
To provide an overview of some key developments in aesthetics, from the ancient Greeks to the present day;
To identify key debates, and to adopt and defend a position with regard to these;
To evaluate arguments presented by theorists working in the field of aesthetics.
Reading List
Extracts from the texts studied will be provided to students.
Optional background reading:
Beardsley, M.C., 1966. Aesthetics from Classical Greece to the Present - A Short History. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.
Cazeaux, C., ed., 2000. The Continental Aesthetics Reader. London: Routledge.
Kearney, R. and Rasmussen, D., eds., 2001. Continental Aesthetics - An Anthology. Oxford: Blackwell.
Dickie, G., Sclafani, R. and Roblin, R., eds., 1989. Aesthetics - A Critical Anthology. 2nd ed. New York: St Martin's.
Rice, P. and Waugh, P. 2001. Modern Literary Theory. 4th ed. London: Arnold.
Web sources
There will be a course home page, accessible via a link from http://www.glaucon.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/
This will contain extracts from primary sources, tutorial questions, and weekly summaries of work covered.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserMr James Mooney
Tel: (0131 6)50 3077
Email: james.mooney@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Diane Mcmillan
Tel: (0131 6)50 6912
Email: D.McMillan@ed.ac.uk
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