THE UNIVERSITY of EDINBURGH

DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2014/2015
Archive for reference only
THIS PAGE IS OUT OF DATE

University Homepage
DRPS Homepage
DRPS Search
DRPS Contact
DRPS : Course Catalogue : Edinburgh College of Art : Music

Postgraduate Course: Introduction to Musicology (MUSI11051)

Course Outline
SchoolEdinburgh College of Art CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course is designed to introduce students to the main approaches and methodologies practiced by contemporary musicologists and some of the issues involved in using them.
Course description Topics covered in the course will include:
- Introduction to Musicology
- Musicology and Recording
- Constructing and Critiquing the Canon
- Audio/Visual media
- Editing music why do it?
- Documents and the historian
- Musical Institutions
- Music and Politics
- Music Historiography
- Music and Post-colonialism
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2014/15, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  None
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Feedback/Feedforward Hours 8, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 168 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) One 3,000-word essay, worth 40% of total course mark, due in Week 7 of the course.

One 3,000-word essay, worth 60% of total course mark, due at the beginning of Semester 2.
Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Show a critical understanding of key concepts, theories and methodologies used in both historical and contemporary musicology

  2. Address specific issues in musicology through reading, classroom presentations and written assignments
  3. Exercise a substantial level of initiative and independent thinking as applied to issues and problems in musicology
  4. Be able to engage in debate and communicate concepts in musicology with peers and senior colleagues
Reading List
Indicative bibliography:

D. Kern Holoman and Claude Palisca,
Musicology in the 1980s (New York, 1982)
Carl Dahlhaus, Foundations of Music History
(Cambridge, 1983)
James W. Pruett and Thomas P. Stavens,
Research Guide to Musicology (Chicago,
1985)
Joseph Kerman Musicology (London, 1985)
Katherine Bergeron and Philip Bohlmann,
Disciplining Music: Musicology and its
canons (Chicago, 1992)
Nicholas Cook and Mark Everist, Rethinking
Music (Oxford, 1999)
Nicholas Cook, Music: A Very Short
Introduction (Oxford, 2000)
Alastair Williams, Constructing Musicology
(Aldershot, 2001)
Martin Clayton, Trevor Herbert and Richard
Middleton eds., The Cultural Study of
Music: a Critical Introduction (New York
and London, 2003)
Eric Clarke and Nicholas Cook eds., Empirical
Musicology: Aims, Methods, Prospects
(Oxford, 2004)
David Beard and Kenneth Gloag, Musicology:
the Key Concepts (London/New York,
2005)
Tim Crawford and Lorna Gibson eds.,
Modern Methods for Musicology:
Prospects, Proposals and Realities
(Aldershot, 2009)
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsMusicology, historical musicology, canon, musical documents
Contacts
Course organiserDr Noel O'Regan
Tel: (0131 6)50 2429
Email: N.O'Regan@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Jennifer Watson
Tel: (0131 6)51 5735
Email: Jennifer.A.Watson@ed.ac.uk
Navigation
Help & Information
Home
Introduction
Glossary
Search DPTs and Courses
Regulations
Regulations
Degree Programmes
Introduction
Browse DPTs
Courses
Introduction
Humanities and Social Science
Science and Engineering
Medicine and Veterinary Medicine
Other Information
Combined Course Timetable
Prospectuses
Important Information
 
© Copyright 2014 The University of Edinburgh - 12 January 2015 4:26 am