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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2014/2015
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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences : Philosophy

Postgraduate Course: Ancient Ethics MSc (PHIL11092)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThe course will examine theories of virtue and the good in ancient thinkers. We will use Aristotle┐s Nicomachean Ethics as our main text, but comparisons will be made with the views of Plato and of Hellenistic philosophers. Topics discussed will include the human good, moral and intellectual virtues, responsibility, pleasure, friendship, and the place of philosophy in the good life. The impact of ancient theories of virtue on later thought will also be considered.

Shared with UG course Ancient Ethics PHIL10101.

Formative feedback available;
- opportunity to submit a formative essay by the week 6 closing deadline
- fortnightly meetings with Dr Mason
Course description Not entered
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2014/15, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  10
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 22, Feedback/Feedforward Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 172 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) One 2,500 word essay

Assignment deadline: Monday 15th December 2014 by 12 noon
Word limit: 2500 words maximum
Return deadline: Monday 19th January 2015
Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course, students should have acquired
- an understanding of some major issues in ancient theories of virtue
- an understanding of how these issues relate to continuing debates
- an ability to read closely, analyse and criticise ancient philosophical texts.

They should also have further developed the following skills
- written skills
- the ability to take part in group discussion
- the ability to present and defend arguments
- the ability to understand and analyse arguments
Reading List
None
Additional Information
Course URL Please see Learn page
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
Additional Class Delivery Information Taught by Dr Andrew Mason
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserProf Theodore Scaltsas
Tel: (0131 6)50 3649
Email: Scaltsas@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Lynsey Buchanan
Tel: (0131 6)51 5002
Email: Lynsey.Buchanan@ed.ac.uk
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