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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2014/2015
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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Scottish History

Undergraduate Course: Rome and the Caledonians (SCHI10054)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 3 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThrough a combination of archaeological, linguistic, and textual evidence and associated scholarly perspectives, ┐Rome and the Caledonians┐ examines Roman military, economic, and diplomatic activity in northern Britain in the period AD 50-500, as well as the indigenous societies┐ responses to and exploitation of sustained Roman interest in them. The course begins with introductions to the principal actors, events, and issues in the history of Romano-British history in this part of Britain, then moves on to reflect on several different facets of relations between Rome and the northern British ┐barbarians┐, including changes in relationships through time; the significance of Rome┐s inability or reluctance to subject the island┐s northern peoples to conquest, occupation, and assimilation on a permanent basis; how and why indigenous societies changed in the age of Roman interventionism; the rise and spread of Christianity; and the paradigms of ┐romanization┐ and barbarian hostility and indomitability. Both current and influential past research bearing on the subject is studied, and issues surrounding the interpretation of sources of evidence feature prominently in course work.
Course description 1 Course introduction: Rome, native ┐tribes┐, and Iron Age societies

2 MUSEUM VISIT

3 Flavian northern Britain: Tacitus, Agricola, and Agricola

4 Walls, frontiers, and frontier policies

5 The Severan wars: causes, courses, and consequences

6 Crises, conspiracies, and confederations: Rome and the Picts

7 Roman forts and camps: life and death in Roman northern Britain

8 Rome and the evolution of indigenous society

9 Rome and the evoluation of indigenous identities

10 Rome and the advance of Christianity

11 Roman Scotland: a failed project?
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements A pass or passes in 40 credits of first level historical courses or equivalent and a pass or passes in 40 credits of second level historical courses or equivalent.
Before enrolling students on this course, Directors are asked to contact the History Honours Admission Secretary to ensure that a place is available (Tel: 503783).
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesVisiting students should usually have at least 3 History courses at grade B or above (or be predicted to obtain this) for entry to this course. We will only consider University/College level courses.
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2014/15, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  23
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 22, Summative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 172 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 67 %, Coursework 33 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Students will submit an individual essay of 3000 words and sit a two-hour Degree Examination. The final mark will be composed of the essay mark, weighted at one-third of the final mark, and the exam mark, weighted at two-thirds of the final mark.
Visiting Student Variant Assessment
Students will submit an individual essay, weighted as one-third of the final mark; and a take-home examination assignment, weighted as two-thirds of the final mark.
Feedback Not entered
Exam Information
Exam Diet Paper Name Hours & Minutes
Main Exam Diet S2 (April/May)2:00
Academic year 2014/15, Part-year visiting students only (VV1) Quota:  3
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 22, Summative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 172 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 67 %, Coursework 33 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Students will submit an individual essay of 3000 words and sit a two-hour Degree Examination. The final mark will be composed of the essay mark, weighted at one-third of the final mark, and the exam mark, weighted at two-thirds of the final mark.
Visiting Student Variant Assessment
Students will submit an individual essay, weighted as one-third of the final mark; and a take-home examination assignment, weighted as two-thirds of the final mark.
Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Successful students will demonstrate (by way of essay and examination) a sophisticated understanding of key themes and aspects of the study of Roman Iron Age Scotland, including its native societies and cultures.
  2. Successful students will demonstrate (by way of essay and examination) recognition of the potential and limitations of different categories of written and material evidence in pursuing the study of the Roman Iron Age in Scotland.
  3. Successful students will produce a sound and competent essay which explores an approved research question.
Reading List
Breeze, D. J. 1982. The northern frontiers of Roman Britain (London).
Breeze, D. J. 2006. Roman Scotland: frontier country (2nd edn; London).
Esmonde Cleary, A. S. 1989. The Ending of Roman Britain (London).
Fraser, J. E. 2009. From Caledonia to Pictland: Scotland to 795 (Edinburgh), chapters 1-3.
Frere, S. S. 1999. Britannia: a history of Roman Britain (4th edn: London).
Hanson, W. S. and G. S. Maxwell. 1986. Rome's north west frontier: the Antonine Wall (2nd edn; Edinburgh).
Harding, D. W. 2004. The Iron Age in northern Britain: Celts and Romans, natives and invaders (London and New York).
Maxwell, G. S. 1989. The Romans in Scotland (Edinburgh).
Millett, M. 1990. The Romanization of Britain: an essay in archaeological interpretation (Cambridge).
Salway, P. 1981. Roman Britain (Oxford History of England 1A: Oxford).
Additional Information
Course URL http://www.shc.ed.ac.uk/scothistory/undergraduate/
Graduate Attributes and Skills - independent gathering of relevant evidence pertaining to a posed problem
- critical consideration of evidence in order to arrive at sound conclusions
- evaluating the work of others, including peers
- presenting evaluations and conclusions clearly in both written and oral form
- independent management of personal timetable, workload and other priorities in order to meet established deadlines
KeywordsCaledonians
Contacts
Course organiserDr James Fraser
Tel: (0131 6)50 4034
Email: james.e.fraser@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Clare Guymer
Tel: (0131 6)50 4030
Email: clare.guymer@ed.ac.uk
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