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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2016/2017

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : History

Undergraduate Course: Enlightenment Scotland c.1690 - c.1800 (HIST10339)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 4 Undergraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits40 ECTS Credits20
SummaryThe principal aim of the course is to allow students to familiarize themselves with some of the most influential and important developments in Scottish intellectual culture of the eighteenth century, including the ideas of major figures such as Adam Smith and David Hume, and to relate these debates to their respective institutional, political and cultural contexts.
Course description The principal aim of the course is to allow students to familiarize themselves with some of the most influential and important debates and trends in Scottish intellectual culture of the eighteenth century, including the ideas of major figures such as Adam Smith and David Hume, and to relate these debates to their respective institutional, political and cultural contexts. Students will be encouraged to engage with the conflicting interpretations to be found in the secondary literature and, above all, to draw directly on evidence from primary texts, which are readily available in print and online, in order to develop and substantiate their arguments.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Students MUST NOT also be taking The Scottish Enlightenment (HIST10158) AND The Scottish Enlightenment: Origins, Contexts and Ideas (SCHI10076)
Other requirements A pass in 40 credits of third level historical courses or equivalent.
Before enrolling students on this course, Personal Tutors are asked to contact the History Honours Admission Secretary to ensure that a place is available (Tel: 503767).
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2016/17, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  15
Course Start Full Year
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 400 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 44, Summative Assessment Hours 4, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 8, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 344 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 67 %, Coursework 33 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Coursework:
During the year students must submit two essays with a maximum of 3,000 words each (including footnotes). Each of the two essays counts for one sixth of the final mark for the course. One third of the final mark will therefore be based on coursework.

Examinations:
Towards the end of the academic year students will sit two examinations of two hours each. Each of these examinations counts for one third of the final mark for the course. In each of the exams students must answer two out of a total of six or more questions.
Feedback Students will receive written feedback on their coursework, and will have the opportunity to discuss that feedback further with the Course Organiser during their published office hours or by appointment.
Exam Information
Exam Diet Paper Name Hours & Minutes
Main Exam Diet S2 (April/May)12:00
Main Exam Diet S2 (April/May)22:00
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, command of the body of knowledge considered in the course;
  2. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to read, analyse and reflect critically upon relevant scholarship;
  3. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to understand, evaluate and utilise a variety of primary source material;
  4. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, the ability to develop and sustain scholarly arguments in oral and written form, by formulating appropriate questions and utilising relevant evidence;
  5. demonstrate independence of mind and initiative; intellectual integrity and maturity; an ability to evaluate the work of others, including peers.
Reading List
Alexander Broadie, The Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh, 2001).

Roy Porter, Enlightenment. Britain and the Creation of the Modern World (London, 2000).

Nicholas Phillipson, David Hume: the philosopher as historian (London, 2011).

Thomas Ahnert, The Moral Culture of the Scottish Enlightenment, 1690 - 1805 (London and New Haven, 2014).

John Robertson, The Case for the Enlightenment. Scotland and Naples 1680 1760 (Cambridge, 2005),

R. Sher, Church and University in the Scottish Enlightenment (Edinburgh and Princeton, 1985).

Colin Kidd, Subverting Scotland's Past: Scottish Whig historians and the creation of an Anglo-British identity, c. 1689 - c. 1830 (Cambridge, 1993).
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsEnlightenment
Contacts
Course organiserDr Thomas Ahnert
Tel: (0131 6)50 3777
Email: Thomas.Ahnert@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Stephanie Blakey
Tel: (0131 6)50 3580
Email: steph.blakey@ed.ac.uk
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