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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2016/2017

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Lifelong Learning (HCA)

Undergraduate Course: Auld Enemies: Scotland and England in the Later Middle Ages (LLLE07013)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 7 (Year 1 Undergraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits10 ECTS Credits5
SummaryThis is a for-credit course offered by the Centre for Open Learning (COL); only students registered with COL should be enrolled.

A survey of Anglo-Scottish relations during the later Middle Ages, from 1286 to 1560. Explore the causes and results of Anglo-Scottish conflict during this period, and also consider some of the more peaceful interactions between the 'Auld Enemies', through trade, religion and the arts. Along the way we will examine the careers of important individuals, including Edward I, William Wallace and James IV.
Course description Content of course
1. Setting the Scene: An introduction to the main themes covered in the course, as well as some discussion of the political situation prior to 1286.
2. 'Braveheart' and 'Longshanks':A study of the first phase of the Wars of Independence, with particular emphasis on the careers of the two key personalities: King Edward I of England and Sir William Wallace.
3. The Wars of the Bruces: A survey of events in the period 1306-1371, with particular emphasis on the career of King Robert I of Scotland. Sources for discussion will include Barbour's Bruce.
4. Turning Fortune's Wheel: Analysis of Anglo-Scottish relations during the early Stewart period, from 1371 to 1402. There will be particular emphasis on the activities of the Percy and Douglas families, including their famous clash at Otterburn.
5. Peace or War? A survey of events in the period 1402-1488, including discussion of the arguments put forward for peace at this time. This session will provide an opportunity to consider some of the more constructive interactions between Scotland and England, notably through migration, religion and trade.
6. The Thistle and the Rose: Discussion of Anglo-Scottish relations during the reign of James IV of Scotland (1488-1513), including a detailed study of the Battle of Flodden.
7. Nationality and Identity: Analysis of attitudes towards nationality and identity, as expressed in a wide range of sources (including political tracts and literature). There will be a chance to read and discuss the Declaration of Arbroath.
8. The Anglo-Scottish Borders: A Frontier Society? A study of society in the Borders, including analysis of the impact of warfare on local communities. Sources for discussion will include the Border Ballads.
9. The European Dimension: Scotland, England and the Hundred Years' War- Discussion of the impact of the 'Auld Alliance'. There will be a particular focus on the political and military implications, but we will also consider the economic and cultural effects.
10. Change and Continuity- A survey of Anglo-Scottish relations in the period 1513-1560, including some discussion of the impact of the Reformation.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2016/17, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  18
Course Start Lifelong Learning - Session 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 100 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 20, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 2, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 78 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) The assessment is a 2000 word essay, worth 100% of the total mark.
Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Analyse the causes of conflict between Scotland and England during the later Middle Ages
  2. Describe the course of warfare and diplomacy, with an emphasis on the careers of key personalities
  3. Evaluate how society in the two realms was affected by Anglo-Scottish conflict
  4. Assess some of the more peaceful interactions between Scotland and England
  5. Demonstrate the above learning outcomes in the assessment
Reading List
Essential
Allan, D., 2011. Understand Scottish History. London: Hodder Education.
Brown, M., 2004. The Wars of Scotland, 1214-1371. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Recommended
Dawson, J., 2007. Scotland Re-Formed, 1488-1587. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Ferguson, W., 1994. Scotland┐s Relations with England: A Survey to 1707. Edinburgh: The Saltire Society.
Grant, A., 1991. Independence and Nationhood: Scotland 1306-1469. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
MacDonald, A., 2000. Border Bloodshed: Scotland and England at War, 1369-1403. East Linton: Tuckwell Press.
Sadler, J., 2006. Border Fury: England and Scotland at War, 1296-1568. Harlow: Longman.
Web sources
Website of Learning and Teaching Scotland: http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/scotlandshistory/.
Scotland┐s History Website (BBC): http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/history/.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
Special Arrangements This is a for-credit course offered by the Centre for Open Learning (COL); only students registered with COL should be enrolled.
KeywordsZZoll
Contacts
Course organiserDr Sally Crumplin
Tel:
Email: Sally.Crumplin@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Zofia Guertin
Tel: (0131 6)51 1855
Email: Zofia.Guertin@ed.ac.uk
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