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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2016/2017

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Social and Political Science : Postgrad (School of Social and Political Studies)

Postgraduate Course: Emerging Powers (PGSP11449)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Social and Political Science CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThe global economy and global politics are currently in a period of immense change. For over half a century, the international system was dominated by the United States and other Western states. Yet there has recently been a significant shift of global economic activity from the Global North to the Global South, with major developing countries - often identified collectively as "the BRICS" (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) emerging as key players in the world economy. Along with their growing economic might, the emerging powers are increasingly asserting themselves in global politics and demanding a greater role in global governance. This transformation has been identified as one of the most important in modern history and prompted considerable debate in academic and policy circles around the world about the agendas of the emerging powers and the consequences of their rise. This course examines the role and impact of the emerging powers in the international system. It begins by analyzing the politics, economics, and foreign policy objectives of these countries. It then turns to assessing the sources and nature of contemporary power shifts and their implications for a variety of different areas of global politics and governance, including security, human rights, environment, trade, finance, and development.
Course description The global economy and global politics are currently in a period of immense change. For over half a century, the international system was dominated by the United States and other Western states. Yet there has recently been a significant shift of global economic activity from the Global North to the Global South, with major developing countries - often identified collectively as "the BRICS" (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) - emerging as key players in the world economy. Along with their growing economic might, the emerging powers are increasingly asserting themselves in global politics and demanding a greater role in global governance. This transformation has been identified as one of the most important in modern history and prompted considerable debate in academic and policy circles around the world about the agendas of the emerging powers and the consequences of their rise.

Emerging Powers is an optional course for MSc students. The course examines the role and impact of the emerging powers in the international system. It begins by analyzing the politics, economics, and foreign policy objectives of these countries. It then turns to assessing the sources and nature of contemporary power shifts and their implications for a variety of different areas of global politics and governance, including security, human rights, environment, trade, finance, and development.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Students MUST have passed: International Political Economy (PGSP11171)
Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Not being delivered
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Critically understand the main areas of study, including key concepts, actors and dynamics related to contemporary power shifts in the global economy and global politics.
  2. Assess competing claims and make informed judgments about current complex issues related to the rise of new powers.
  3. Understand core academic debates surrounding contemporary power shifts.
  4. Present - in written and verbal form - coherent, balanced arguments about important political and economic topics.
  5. Enhance their research skills by planning and executing a significant project of research on a major issue related to the emerging powers.
Reading List
Armijo, Leslie Elliott. 2007. "The BRICs Countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) as Analytical Category: Mirage or Insight?" Asian Perspective 31(4):7-42.

Ban, Cornel, and Mark Blyth. 2013. "The BRICs and the Washington Consensus: An introduction." Review of International Political Economy 20(2):241-5.

Ravallion, Martin. 2009. "A comparative perspective on poverty reduction in Brazil, China and India."
World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series. (Available online)

World Bank. 2011. Multipolarity: The New Global Economy. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

O'Neill, Jim. 2001. "Building Better Economic BRICs." New York: Goldman Sachs, Global Economic Paper No. 66. Available at:
http://www.goldmansachs.com/our-thinking/archive/archive-pdfs/build-better-brics.pdf

Whyte, Martin King. 2009. "Paradoxes of China's Economic Boom." Annual Review of Sociology 35(1):371-92.

Subramanian, A. 2011. "The Inevitable Superpower: Why China's Dominance Is a Sure Thing." Foreign Affairs 90(5):66.

Babones, Salvatore. 2011. "The Middling Kingdom: The Hype and the Reality of China's Rise." Foreign Affairs 90(5):79.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Kristen Hopewell
Tel:
Email: Kristen.Hopewell@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Gillian Macdonald
Tel: (0131 6)51 3244
Email: gillian.macdonald@ed.ac.uk
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