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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2016/2017

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Social and Political Science : Social Anthropology

Undergraduate Course: Social Anthropology 1A: The Life Course (SCAN08013)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Social and Political Science CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 8 (Year 1 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course is intended as an introduction to social anthropology - taking as its central theme and organising structure the life course from birth to death, conceived in very broad terms. As well as encompassing life crisis moments and rituals of birth, marriage, and death, the course includes such themes as gender, personhood, work and making a living, the house, consumption and exchange, health, and the body. It begins with a brief consideration of what anthropologists do thinking about participant observation and fieldwork; and it ends with a brief discussion of how anthropological subjects are placed - and place themselves - in history.
Course description Social Anthropology is the comparative study of human conduct and thought in their social context. Societies around the world vary enormously in their social, cultural and political forms, and their individual members display an initially overwhelming diversity of ideas and behaviours. The study of these variations, and the common humanity that renders them intelligible to sympathetic outsiders, lies at the heart of Social Anthropology. Anthropologists acquire their information through a distinctive method termed participant observation. This means that they spend many months or even years living among the people with whom they are researching, sharing their experiences as far as possible, and hence attempting to gain a well -rounded understanding of that society and of the activities and opinions of its members.

This course is intended as an introduction to social anthropology - taking as its central theme and organising structure the life course from birth to death, conceived in very broad terms. As well as encompassing life crisis moments and rituals of birth, marriage, and death, the course includes such themes as gender, personhood, work and making a living, the house, consumption and exchange, health, and the body. It begins with a brief consideration of what anthropologists do, especially participant observation and fieldwork; and it ends with a brief discussion of how anthropological subjects are placed--and place themselves--in history.

Indicative themes: Conception, birth, childhood, initiation, personhood, the body, wellbeing and health, witchcraft & illness, women & men, marriage, making a home, consumption, exchange & gifts, work, hospitality & friendship, aging & memory, death and funerary rituals, descent & history

Sample readings: Eller, Jack David. 2009. Cultural Anthropology: Global Forces, Local Lives. New York: Routledge; Eriksen, T. H. 2001 Small Place, Large Issues. London: Pluto Press.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2016/17, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  351
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Seminar/Tutorial Hours 9, Summative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 165 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 60 %, Coursework 40 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Written Exam 60 %,
Coursework 40 %
********************
Students will be required to complete one assessed essay of around 1500-2000 words (40% of the overall mark) and a degree examination consisting of one 2-hour paper (60% of the overall mark).
Feedback Feedback on short essay; class discussion of essay plans.
Exam Information
Exam Diet Paper Name Hours & Minutes
Main Exam Diet S1 (December)Social Anthropology 1A: The Life Course2:00
Resit Exam Diet (August)Social Anthropology 1A: The Life Course2:00
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Through an appreciation of the cultural diversity underlying the life course across the world, students will gain a broad appreciation of both the difficulties and possibilities inherent in the comparative study of different societies and cultures.
  2. They will be able to draw out contrasts and similarities in life course processes and events between their own and other societies, recognising the particularities of these societies and engaging reflectively with the value of their own cultural and social context.
  3. They will be aware of key anthropological concepts and concerns in the study of birth, initiation, marriage, and death, and will be in a position to appreciate the significance of these concerns in a way that contributes to a critical and informed understanding of the contemporary world.
  4. They will be well prepared for further study in Social Anthropology and related disciplines.
Reading List
None
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Stefan Ecks
Tel: (0131 6)50 6969
Email: Stefan.Ecks@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMr Ewen Miller
Tel: (0131 6)50 3925
Email: Ewen.Miller@ed.ac.uk
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