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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Economics : Economics

Undergraduate Course: Economics of Sport (ECNM10068)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Economics CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 3 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThe study of sports covers a large range of economic subfields (labour, public finance, tournaments and auctions, incentives, supply and demand etc.). Economics of Sport will visit the most important economic aspects of the industry. In addition to the textbooks, we will look at leading academic papers in the area to assess the empirical evidence and the theory that has been developed in the light of this evidence.
Course description This course should appeal to a wide range of students of differing skill levels and technical abilities. It will provide experience of working with econometric analyses as well as of constructing models and solving problems.

Topics covered include: Demand, theory and empirical issues; Salaries: Models and Empirics; Migration and Discrimination; Forecasting Results; The Theory of Leagues; Game Theory in the arena; World Sporting Events and CBAs.

The course is taught through a programme of lectures. The course involves an assessed project, in which students are required to collaborate in groups and undertake their own modelling, estimation, evaluation and reporting, developing skills frequently expected of contemporary economics graduates in a wide variety of contexts.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Students MUST have passed: Economics 2 (ECNM08006)
Co-requisites Students MUST also take: Essentials of Econometrics (ECNM10052) AND Topics in Microeconomics (ECNM10070)
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesVisiting students should usually have an equivalent of at least 4 semester-long Economics courses at grade B or above (or be predicted to obtain this) for entry to this course. This MUST INCLUDE courses in Intermediate Macroeconomics (with calculus); Intermediate Microeconomics (with calculus); Probability and Statistics; and Introductory Econometrics. If macroeconomics and microeconomics courses are not calculus-based, then, in addition, Calculus (or Mathematics for Economics) is required.
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2017/18, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  None
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Seminar/Tutorial Hours 4, Summative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 170 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 75 %, Coursework 25 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Team project (25%)
Degree examination (75%)
Feedback Not entered
Exam Information
Exam Diet Paper Name Hours & Minutes
Main Exam Diet S2 (April/May)2:00
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. A knowledge and understanding of the theoretical and empirical analysis of the economics of sport, including principles, models and associated mathematical and statistical techniques, along with empirical analysis and applications and policy implications of those models and a deeper understanding of recent research activity in some more specialised areas.
  2. Research and investigative skills such as problem framing and solving and the ability to assemble and evaluate complex evidence and arguments.
  3. Communication skills in order to critique, create and communicate understanding and to collaborate with and relate to others.
  4. Personal effectiveness through task-management, time-management, teamwork and group interaction, dealing with uncertainty and adapting to new situations, personal and intellectual autonomy through independent learning.
  5. Practical/technical skills such as, modelling skills (abstraction, logic, succinctness), qualitative and quantitative analysis, programming of statistical packages and general IT literacy.
Reading List
Main text: Dobson-Goddard 'The Economics of Football', 2nd ed. Cambridge 2011.
Preliminary reading: Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol.19, No.4, 2003.
Journal articles will be referenced for each session.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills See Learning Outcomes
Course organiserDr Colin Roberts
Tel: (0131 6)50 8353
Course secretaryMrs Anna Domagala
Tel: (0131 6)51 5305
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