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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2017/2018

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Latin

Undergraduate Course: Latin Lyric (LATI10003)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 3 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThe course concentrates on the later carmina of Horace (the Carmen Saeculare and Odes of books 3 and 4), but also considers a sample of the epodes and odes from earlier in his career, together with the strictly lyric poetry of Catullus. The course encourages close reading of texts (in Latin), awareness of literary convention and metrical form, and evaluation of modern critical interpretations. It also examines Latin lyric as a response to classical Greek lyric and Hellenistic poetry, shifting concepts of the lyric poet's role, and social and political aspects of Horatian lyric.
Course description The course will consist primarily of reading and discussion classes centring on classical Latin lyric poetry, in particular Horace. Attention will be given, inter alia, to metre and style, literary models and intertextuality, ideology and politics. The following eleven-week schedule is indicative of the course content, though emphases may change according to the lecturer┐s interests:

Week 1: Introduction: Greek lyric and Rome
Week 2: Catullan lyric: reading and discussion classes
Weeks 3-4: Horace, Odes 1: reading and discussion classes
Weeks 5-6: Horace, Epodes: reading and discussion classes
Weeks 7-8: Horace, Odes 3: reading and discussion classes
Weeks 9-10: Horace, Carmen Saeculare and Odes 4
Week 11: Conclusion and overview

Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Students MUST have passed: ( Latin 2A (LATI08011) OR Latin 2a Ex-Beginners (LATI08013)) AND Latin 2B (LATI08012)
Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Additional Costs None.
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesAdvanced-level ability in Latin language and literature, equivalent to two years' study at the University of Edinburgh (if uncertain, consult the course organiser).
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Not being delivered
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. demonstrate through written coursework assignments, oral presentation and tutorial discussion, and written exam the ability to translate fluently and accurately from the prescribed texts into clear and appropriate English
  2. demonstrate through written coursework assignments, oral presentation and tutorial discussion, and written exam knowledge of the principal features of classical Latin lyric poetry
  3. demonstrate through written coursework assignments, oral presentation and tutorial discussion, and written exam the ability comment critically on passages of the prescribed texts, and to relate these to the wider literary and historical framework
  4. demonstrate through written coursework assignments, oral presentation and tutorial discussion, and written exam command of the principal approaches to Latin lyric, and understanding of how these have developed over time
  5. demonstrate through written coursework assignments, oral presentation and tutorial discussion, and written exam produce problem-oriented, well-researched, and well-argued coursework essays on specific aspects of Latin lyric poetry
Reading List
Ancona, R. (1994) Time and the erotic in Horace's Odes. Durham, NC.
Cairns, F. (2012) Roman lyric: Collected papers on Catullus and Horace. Berlin.
Commager, S. (1962) The Odes of Horace: A critical study. New Haven, CT.
Fitzgerald, W. (1988) 'Power and impotence in Horace's Epodes', Ramus 17: 176-91.
Fitzgerald, W. (1995) Catullan Provocations: Lyric poetry and the drama of position. Berkeley.
Fraenkel, E. (1957) Horace. Oxford.
Gaisser, J.H. (2009) Catullus. Blackwell Introductions to the Ancient World. Malden, MA.
Grimal, P. (1978) Le lyrisme Ó Rome. Paris.
Harrison, S.J. (ed.) (2007) The Cambridge companion to Horace. Cambridge.
Hills, P.D. (2005) Horace. London.
Horsfall, N. (1998) 'The first person singular in Horace's Carmina', in P. E. Knox and C. Foss (eds.) Style and tradition: Studies in honour of Wendell Clausen. Stuttgart. 40-54.
Jenkyns, R. (1982) Three classical poets: Sappho, Catullus, and Juvenal. London.
Mayer, R. (2012) Horace: Odes, Book 1. Cambridge.
Nisbet, R.G.M. and Rudd, N. (2004) A Commentary on Horace: Odes, Book III. Oxford.
Putnam, M.C.J. (1986). Artifices of eternity: Horace's Fourth Book of Odes. Ithaca, NY.
Watson, L.C. (2003) A Commentary on Horace's Epodes. Oxford.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
Special Arrangements In order for a student from outwith Classics to be enrolled on this course, contact must be made with a Course Secretary on 50 3580 in order for approval to be obtained.
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserProf Andrew Erskine
Tel: (0131 6)50 3591
Email: Andrew.Erskine@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Toni Wigglesworth
Tel: (0131 6)50 3580
Email: Toni.Wigglesworth@ed.ac.uk
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