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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2017/2018

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Scottish History

Undergraduate Course: Medieval Scottish History (SCHI08010)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Humanities and Social Science
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 8 (Year 1 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course offers students an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of medieval Scotland from the 'Dark Age' period (beginning roughly ad 300) to the end of the Middle Ages in (roughly) ad 1500, setting the country's fascinating, particular story within a wider European context.

The LECTURE programme focuses on the origins and formation of the Scottish kingdom and people and the European influences that shaped them, the rise and growth of royal power and government and its territorial expansion, the struggle for control over Scotland between the Scottish establishment and the English crown, and the post-war rise of the Stewarts and new political and governmental developments. All the while, lectures give thought to social, religious and cultural trends, whilst setting the country's fascinating, particular story within a wider European context. Through WEEKLY TUTORIALS, students are provided with preliminary insights into medieval sources and key debates among scholars.
Course description The lecture programme focuses on the origins and formation of the Scottish kingdom and people and the internal and external influences that shaped them. Lectures chart the rise and growth of royal power and government and its territorial expansion to encapsulate what we think of today as Scotland, the struggle for control over northern Britain between the Scottish establishment and the English crown, and the rise of the Stewarts and the new political and governmental developments overseen by them. Lectures give frequent thought to social and cultural (especially religious) trends alongside these political and institutional themes.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Not being delivered
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, a sound knowledge of the subject considered in the course;
  2. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to assimilate a variety of sources and formulate critical opinions on them;
  3. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to research, structure and complete written work of a specified length, or within a specified time;
  4. demonstrate an ability to make informed contributions to class discussion and give an oral presentation as required;
  5. demonstrate an ability to organise their own learning, manage their workload, and work to a timetable
Reading List
L. Alcock. Kings and Warriors, Craftsmen and Priests in Northern Britain AD 550-850 (2003)
G. W. S. Barrow. Kingship and Unity: Scotland, 1000-1306 (2nd edition, 2003)
M. Brown. The Wars of Scotland, 1214-1371 (2004)
E. Campbell. Saints and Sea-Kings: the first kingdom of the Scots (1999)
J. Dawson. Scotland Re-formed, 1488-1587 (2007)
A. A. M. Duncan. Scotland: the making of the kingdom (1975), chapters 2-6
S. M. Foster. Picts, Gaels and Scots: Early Historic Scotland (2nd edition, 2004)
J. E. Fraser. From Caledonia to Pictland: Scotland to 795 (2009)
A. Grant. Independence and Nationhood: Scotland, 1306-1469 (1984)
R. Oram. Domination and Lordship: Scotland 1070-1230 (2011)
A. Woolf. From Pictland to Alba, 789-1070 (2007)
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Independent gathering of relevant evidence pertaining to a posed problem;
Critical consideration of evidence in order to arrive at sound conclusions;
Evaluating the work of others, including peers;
Presenting evaluations and conclusions clearly in both written and oral form;
Independent management of personal timetable, workload and other priorities in order to meet established deadlines
Additional Class Delivery Information All students will attend a weekly tutorial group from Weeks 2 to 11 inclusive.
KeywordsMedieval Scottish
Contacts
Course organiserDr Stephen Boardman
Tel: (0131 6)50 4035
Email: Steve.Boardman@ed.ac.uk
Course secretary
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