THE UNIVERSITY of EDINBURGH

DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2020/2021

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : Moray House School of Education and Sport : Education

Undergraduate Course: Educational Studies 2b: Inclusion and Citizenship in the 21st Century (EDUA08098)

Course Outline
SchoolMoray House School of Education and Sport CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 8 (Year 2 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis 20-credit course examines the role of the teacher as a professional with responsibility for supporting diverse learners in the classroom as well as preparing these learners to socialize, work and live in a complex and diverse world. The course explores historical and philosophical approaches to individual needs, building on the concepts of child development covered in Education 2a and assists in preparing students for future school placements where relevant. In this course students will deepen their understanding of inclusion and citizenship education, they will begin to look critically at policy and the politics of education, and the ways in which policies are constructed and implemented. Additionally, students will develop their knowledge and understanding towards the role of teacher as an agent for change and using their own personal experience they will share thoughts in order to build the school of the future.
Course description The course is divided in two blocks.

In Block 1: Policy and Practice for Inclusion, Weeks 1 to 5 are focused on different areas of inclusion and the diversity of learners teachers meet in the course of their work. Students are asked to consider teachers' importance as a role model for learners, an agent of transformation and change, and the pivotal point through which educational policy can be enacted in educational settings. As the weeks move on, they will look at Additional Support Needs, race and multiculturalism, and physical impairments of various kinds to see how they can ensure their teaching practices meet different learners' needs in the light of inclusion and social justice.

In Block 2: Schools of the Future, Weeks 5 to 11 build on the gained knowledge and understanding to consider the purposes and role of schooling, the development of future inclusive schools in the context of globalisation, sustainability and social justice and the role of future teachers, in shaping education and prepare critical learners. A key part of the course is to critically consider the contribution of research to educational policy development as well as the influence of practice on shaping the research and educational policy agenda through, for example, critical discourse analysis.

During the course, students will spend time on placement in a range of settings to gain experience of interactions between schools and various agencies aimed at supporting pupils and families and enhancing the educational experiences of learners in different environments including different areas across Scotland. Students will develop their skills in document analysis as a qualitative research method by examining legislation and policy that promotes inclusion, equality and children's rights and considers multi-agency approaches and partnerships in supporting pupils learning in different environments.
During the course, students will spend time on placement in a range of settings to gain experience of interactions between schools and various agencies aimed at supporting pupils and families and enhancing the educational experiences of learners in different environments including different areas across Scotland. Students will develop their skills in document analysis as a qualitative research method by examining legislation and policy that promotes inclusion, equality and children's rights and considers multi-agency approaches and partnerships in supporting pupils learning in different environments.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements Prior to beginning this course, students may be required to apply to join (and cover the cost of joining) the 'Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme'. Advice on how to do this can be obtained by contacting the Moray House School of Education Student Support Office. This process can take several weeks and should be completed prior to the start of the course.
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesPlease be advised that this course is available to all students, including visiting students (SV1). For information please contact Don Stuckey at Student Support Office, MHSES.SSO@ed.ac.uk.

In addition to membership of the PVG scheme, visiting students may also require to provide a 'Certificate of Good Conduct' and/or a character reference from the relevant authorities in their own country. Please contact Moray House School of Education Student Support Office for further details.
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2020/21, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  106
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 196 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) There are two assessed activities.

Assessed Activity 1: 2000 word individual written assignment (60% of course mark)
Students should choose and answer one of the three questions given in relation to policy and politics of inclusive education, teacher agency and inclusive practice. They conduct a critical analysis of one document (e.g. Scottish Government policy, guidance and/or report documentation) relating to the above-mentioned issues of individual need and educational inclusion. Students will need to draw on wider reading about theories of inclusion and on their learning about document analysis as a research method. They, also, need to use their placement and/or personal experience and reflections to help them consider how they will use their chosen policy and/or guidance documentation to inform their future teaching practice.

Assessed Activity 2: 750 word essay
Students are asked to identify the features of a future school with reference to current socio-political changes that influence the school context (globalisation, sustainability, inclusion, citizenship etc.). In the final week of Block 2, the essay will draw together learning from the course to design a school for the future. The essay should take into account the types of teaching and learning methods that might best support the diversity of learners who might be present in such a future school.

Students need to achieve a 40% pass on both assessed activities to pass the course.
Feedback Students receive Formative written feedback on the Assignment 1 from tutors on the course through Turnitin. For Assignment 2, prior to the group presentation task, groups are asked to notify tutors of proposed topics, to allow for informal formative comments at an early stage. Summative feedback from the tutor and peers is provided on group presentations to assist in the final individual written submissions. Written feedback will be provided on the individual written reflection and individual contribution to group presentations from tutor through Turnitin.

Discussion during workshops provides students with an opportunity to receive informal oral feedback from tutors and peers on their understanding of ideas presented in lectures and within their reading.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, and at a level appropriate to a 2nd year undergraduate, students will be able to:

* Plan appropriate support for pupils with additional needs within a social model context
* Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of educational research and its contribution as well as limitations to the formulation of education policy
* Demonstrate basic skills in documentary analysis as a qualitative research method
* Demonstrate an awareness of the impact of globalisation, new technologies and increasing population movements/dynamics/diversities on education policy and practice
Reading List
*Arshad, R., Wrigley, T. & Pratt, L. (Eds.) (2012) Social Justice Re-Examined: dilemmas and solutions for the classroom teacher, Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham.
*Bartlett, S. and Burton, D. (2012) Introduction to Education Studies (3rd Edition), London: SAGE (Chapter 6: Politics and policy in education, pages 132 - 176).
*Scott, D. (2000) Reading Educational Research and Policy, Abingdon: Routledge.
*Miles, S., and Ainscow, M. (2011) Responding to Diversity in Schools, Abingdon: Routledge.
*Laker, A. (Ed.) (2012) The Sociology of Sport and Physical Education: An introduction, Hoboken: Taylor and Francis.
*Cole, M. (Eds.) (2017) Education, Equality and Human Rights, Abingdon: Routledge.
*Biesta, G., Robinson, S. and Priestely, M. (2015) Teacher Agency: An Ecological Approach, London: Bloomsbury.
*Hart, S., Dixon, A., Drummond, J., McIntyre, D. (2004) Learning Without Limits, Berkshire, England: Open University Press.
*Armstrong, A., Armstrong, D., Spandagou, I. (2015) Inclusive Education: International Policy and Practice, London: SAGE.
*Brown, J., Ross, H. and Munn, P. (2012) Democratic Citizenship in Schools, Edinburgh: DUNEDIN.
*Sefton-Green, J, Thomson, P., Jones, K. and Bresler, L. (2011) The Routledge International Handbook of Creative Learning, London: Routledge.
*Beams, S., Higgins, P. and Nicol, R. (2012) Learning Outside the Classroom, London: Routledge.
*Wrigley, T., Thomson, P. & Lingard, B. (Eds.) (2012) Changing Schools: Alternative Ways to Make A World of Difference, London: Routledge.
*Harris, J., Carrington, S., Ainscow, M. (2017) Promoting Equity in Schools: Collaboration, Inquiry and Ethical Leadership, Abingdon: Routledge.
*Adams, M., Bell, L., Goodman, D., and Joshi, K. (2016) Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice, Abingdon: Routledge.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills On completion of the course students will be able to demonstrate:
*A discerning understanding of theories of social justice, inclusion and citizenship.
*Knowledge of professional skills and practices in relation to inclusion and citizenship within education.
*Critical analysis, evaluation and/or synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues within educational policy.
*Skills associated with conveying complex information, analysis and argument through group presentation and written work.
*In workplace settings an ability to co-operate with others and to acquire an understanding of current professional practice.
Special Arrangements Prior to beginning this course, students must apply to join (and cover the cost of joining) the 'Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme'. Advice on how to do this can be obtained by contacting the Moray House School of Education Student Support Office. Students on the MA in Primary Education with... and the MA Physical Education programmes should already hold PVG Scheme membership. However, students who are unsure about whether they do hold the relevant PVG Scheme membership should check with the Student Support Office prior to beginning the course. Bear in mind that the PVG Scheme membership can take several weeks to arrange.

For students who have never been resident in the UK; and students who are normally resident outside the UK, but who have been living in the UK during the 12 month period immediately prior to the course start date:
Prior to beginning this course you must apply to join the PVG Scheme (information above).
In addition to joining the PVG Scheme, you are asked to obtain (and cover the cost of obtaining) one of the following:

1. A Certificate of Good Conduct┐ from the relevant authorities or a letter from the police authority in your own country confirming that you have no criminal record. This information is available if you live in any of the following countries:
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, India, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, USA, Zambia.

2. If you are not resident in any of the above countries and you are unable to obtain this information, you are asked to provide a further written character reference. This reference should be provided on letter-headed paper by a professional person (e.g. employer, doctor, teacher etc) who is not related to you and whom you have known for at least the last two years. The referee should not be the same as your UCAS/UTT referee. The purpose of this additional reference is to confirm the referee has known you for a period of two years and can vouch for your good conduct and character. In addition you must complete and return a Self-Declaration Certificate, which is available from the School of Education Student Support Office.

Student who do not have PVG Scheme membership and (where required) suitable Overseas Certificates/reference (as detailed above), may be unable to take this course.
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Dimitra Tsakalou
Tel: (0)131 651 6410
Email: Dimitra.Tsakalou@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Lorraine Nolan
Tel: (0131 6)51 6571
Email: Lorraine.Nolan@ed.ac.uk
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