THE UNIVERSITY of EDINBURGH

DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2020/2021

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences : Philosophy

Undergraduate Course: Philosophies of Decolonization: Anti-Humanism and Further Explorations in the Construction of Racial Others (PHIL10188)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 4 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course explores the writings and theories of revolutionary Black intellectuals in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean, as well as critical analyses of existing Eurocentric paradigms (feminism, Marxism, liberalism, etc.), with particular attention to the Western construct of the Human.
Course description This course will introduce students to the radical Black traditions that challenge white supremacy, colonialism, and integrationism from the mid-1900s to present. This class is specifically geared towards the production of radical philosophies of liberation and anti-colonial thought that do not reside within the confines of Eurocentric thought or remain dependent on European anthropological theories of social consequence.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Students MUST have passed: Knowledge and Reality (PHIL08017) AND Mind, Matter and Language (PHIL08014)
Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements Students studying on MA Cognitive Science (Humanities) are permitted to take this course without having met the pre-requisites of Mind, Matter and Language (PHIL08014) and Knowledge and Reality (PHIL08014). However, it is advisable that students discuss the suitability of the course with their PT and the course organiser before enrolling.
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesVisiting students should have completed at least 3 Philosophy courses at grade B or above. We will only consider University/College level courses. Applicants should note that, as with other popular courses, meeting the minimum does NOT guarantee admission. These enrolments are managed strictly by the Visiting Student Office, in line with the quotas allocated by the department, and all enquiries to enrol in these courses must be made through the CAHSS Visiting Student Office. It is not appropriate for students to contact the department directly to request additional spaces.
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2020/21, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  0
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 22, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 174 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Midterm Essay - 40% (1,500 words)
Final essay - 55% (3,000 words)
Participation - 5%
Feedback Guidance will be given in advance of each assignment. This may be in the form of an in-class discussion, a handout, or discussion of a component of the assessed work. Instructor feedback on essay outline and peer feedback provides further formative opportunities ahead of final essay.
No Exam Information
Academic year 2020/21, Part-year visiting students only (VV1) Quota:  0
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 22, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 174 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Midterm Essay - 40% (1,500 words)
Final essay - 55% (3,000 words)
Participation - 5%
Feedback Guidance will be given in advance of each assignment. This may be in the form of an in-class discussion, a handout, or discussion of a component of the assessed work. Instructor feedback on essay outline and peer feedback provides further formative opportunities ahead of final essay.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Explain the relationship colonialism has to theories of racial inferiority
  2. Critically assess current arguments concerning democracy, freedom, and empire made within the metropole and those originating from the Global South
  3. Explain the role that anti-colonial movements in Algeria and South Africa played in the development of Internal Colonization models in the United States
  4. Articulate their own views regarding the colonial history of the racial theories invented by Europe and America and its continuing consequences for the HUMAN
  5. Explain the link between decolonialism and contemporary theoretical interventions into Western political philosophy and dehumanization
Reading List
Representative Readings

Huey P. Newton, "War on the Panthers," Newton, "Fear & Doubt," "In Defense of Self-Defense," "Women's Liberation and Gay Liberation," "Eve: The Mother of All Living," and "Dialectics of Nature," in Huey P. Newton Speaks (New York: Seven Stories Press, 2002), and Newton and Erickson, In Search of Common Ground (New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 1973.

Sylvia Wynter, "Ethno-Socio Poetics," Alcheringa 2 (1976): 78-94; Beyond the Word of Man: Glissant & the New Discourse of the Antilles,"World Literature Today 63.4 (1989): 637-648; "Toward the Sociogenic Principle & What It is Like to be Black," in National Identities and Sociopolitical Change in Latin America, eds. Mercedes Duran-Cogan & Antonio Gomez-Moriana [New York: Routledge, 2001], 30-66).

A.J. Williams-Myers, Destructive Impulses: An Examination of an American Secret in Race Relations (Lanham: University Press of America, 1995).

Robert Allen, Black Awakening in Capitalist America: An Analytic History (Read: Introduction, Ch.3 "Black Nationalism," Ch.6-"Black Radicals," & Ch.7-"Transitional Program"), & Claudia Jones "An End to the Neglect of the Problems of Negro Women," in Beyond Containment, ed. Carole Boyce Davies (Banbury: Ayebia Clarke Publishing Ltd., 2011), 74-86.

Aime Cesaire, Discourse on Colonialism (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2000).

Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, white Mask (New York: Grove Press, 1952).

Octave Mannoni, Prospero & Caliban: The Psychology of Colonization (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1950).

Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth (New York: Grove Press, 2005).

Frantz Fanon: "Racism and Culture," "Decolonization and Independence," and "First Truths of the Colonial Problem," in Toward the African Revolution.

Steve Biko: "white Racism and Black Consciousness," and "What is Black Consciousness," "The Definition of Black Consciousness," and "Black Consciousness and the Quest for a True Humanity," in I Write What I Like

Robert F. Williams - Negroes w/Guns (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1963).

Kathleen Cleaver, "Women, Power, Revolution," in Liberation, Imagination, and the Black Panther Party (New York: Routledge, 2001), 123-128, and Linda La Rue, "The Black Movement and Women's Liberation," The Black Scholar (1970): 36-42.

Assata Shakur, "Chapters 1-3," and "Chapters 8 & 9" in Assata: An Autobiography (UK: Zed Books Ltd, 1987).

Kristin Bumiller, In an Abusive State: How Neoliberalism Appropriated the Feminist Movement against Sexual Violence (Durham: Duke University Press, 2008).

Joseph A. Massad, Islam in Liberalism (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015).

Calvin Warren, Ontological Terror (Durham: Duke University Press, 2018).

David Marriott, Whither Fanon?: Studies in the Blackness of Being (Red Wood City, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018).

Frank Wilderson, Afropessimism (London: Liveright, 2020).
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Mindsets: Enquiry and lifelong learning; Aspiration and personal development
Skill groups: Personal and intellectual autonomy; Personal effectiveness
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserProf Tommy Curry
Tel: (0131 6)51 3083
Email: T.J.Curry@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Ann-Marie Cowe
Tel: (0131 6)50 3961
Email: Annmarie.Cowe@ed.ac.uk
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