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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2020/2021

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Social and Political Science : Sociology

Undergraduate Course: Sociology 1B: The Sociological Imagination: Private Troubles, Public Problems (SCIL08005)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Social and Political Science CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 8 (Year 1 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course is designed to explore sociological thinking with regard to a number of issues of contemporary concern. Recent topics included: structure and agency; the sociology of the body; race and society; deviance; economy and society; and social change.
Course description This course complements knowledge gained in Sociology 1A ┐The Sociological Imagination: Individuals and Society┐ and provides a basis for further study in Sociology 2A/B and Honours. The theme of the course is the relationship between private troubles and public problems, i.e. how the personal challenges many of us face in our lives are shaped and defined in ways that often appear to be beyond our direct control. The course will introduce students to the sociological perspective by examining four significant topics in the discipline of sociology. By the end of the course, students will be able to identify some of the social changes, problems, and issues facing modern societies.

Unit 1: What is social structure?
This unit helps students build up their tool kit of key concepts for sociological analysis and critical thinking through the examination of fundamental concepts in sociology (social structure, social organisation, social institutions and social identities).

Unit 2: Norms, order and normalisation
This unit challenges students to not take for granted the taken-for-granted, to unexpect the expected, and to explore how individual social-norm-following is sometimes more intricately connected to public issues and their histories than it might at first appear.

Unit 3: Understanding race and society
This unit introduces students to ways of understanding how ideas about race can shape society, and of the connections between what race means in one society and another. Lectures will address key topics and theoretical perspectives, current research, and public policy concerns.

Unit 4: What is social change?
This unit examines the key conceptual questions involved in the study of social change and compares selected explanations of social change.

The course is taught through lectures and tutorials. Tutorials provide an opportunity to discuss the ideas presented in the course with other students, test them out and get feedback from the tutor. We encourage students to participate fully in the tutorials to get as much out of the course as possible.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2020/21, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  500
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Seminar/Tutorial Hours 9, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 167 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Midterm essay (50% of the overall mark)
Final essay (50% of the overall mark)
Feedback This course is assessed by a mid-semester essay and an end of course essay. Each are worth 50% of your final mark.
Formative assessment: you will receive feedback on your mid-semester essay.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Students will develop their understanding of the sociological perspective
  2. Students will be introduced to four areas of study which illustrate the relationship between private troubles and public problems
  3. Students will understand how sociological perspectives have to adapt to contemporary changes in national and global society and culture
  4. Students will have the ability to critically analyse and evaluate core sociological ideas
  5. Students will demonstrate the ability to understand, summarise and critically assess sociological work
Reading List
None
Additional Information
Course URL http://www.ed.ac.uk/sociol
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
Additional Class Delivery Information One hour tutorials over ten weeks and starting in Week 2
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Nathan Coombs
Tel:
Email: Nathan.Coombs@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Laura Thiessen
Tel: (0131 6)50 3932
Email: laura.thiessen@ed.ac.uk
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