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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2021/2022

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures : English Literature

Postgraduate Course: Contemporary Scottish Fiction (ENLI11061)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Literatures, Languages and Cultures CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course will look at the relationship between Scottish fiction, politics and culture in the context of devolution. We will examine a range of novels published over the last thirty years which showcase the strength and diversity of contemporary Scottish fiction, and consider the ways in which Scottish writing might be seen to reflect larger debates about political and cultural autonomy in the period, issues around cultural identity, and anxieties amongst Scottish intellectuals about the possibilities and dangers of nationalism. However we will also need to consider the ways in which those issues are mediated through the form of the contemporary novel, in particular the nature, variety and extent of contemporary departures from the conventions of realism; even the constitution of the literary field itself. The most striking feature of much of the writing of the period may be its apparent distance from overt political commitment, its distrust of the public realm, suspicion of historical narrative, and its focus on interiority and subjectivity. What does this mean for our understanding of the relationship between literature and society in contemporary Scotland?

*This course is taught jointly with undergraduate students and consequently postgraduate places are limited
Course description This course will look at the relationship between Scottish fiction, politics and culture in the context of devolution. We will examine a range of novels published over the last thirty years which showcase the strength and diversity of contemporary Scottish fiction, and consider the ways in which Scottish writing might be seen to reflect larger debates about political and cultural autonomy in the period, issues around cultural identity, and anxieties amongst Scottish intellectuals about the possibilities and dangers of nationalism. However we will also need to consider the ways in which those issues are mediated through the form of the contemporary novel, in particular the nature, variety and extent of contemporary departures from the conventions of realism; even the constitution of the literary field itself. The most striking feature of much of the writing of the period may be its apparent distance from overt political commitment, its distrust of the public realm, suspicion of historical narrative, and its focus on interiority and subjectivity. What does this mean for our understanding of the relationship between literature and society in contemporary Scotland?
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Additional Costs Essential course texts
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2021/22, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  5
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 196 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) 1 coursework essay of 4000 words (100%)

Feedback Not entered
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course students should expect to be able to demonstrate their familiarity with a range of contemporary Scottish writers and to critically evaluate their work considered against its social and cultural background. Students should be able to discuss the political and ethical dimensions of narrative technique and genre, and suggest why particular works adopt specific formal strategies.
Reading List
Candia McWilliam, Debatable Land
Allan Massie, A Question of Loyalties
Andrew O'Hagan, Our Fathers
Alasdair Gray, 1982 Janine
James Kelman, How Late It Was, How Late
Ali Smith, Like
A.L. Kennedy, So I Am Glad
Alan Warner, Morvern Callar
James Robertson, The Testament of Gideon Mack
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
Special Arrangements Jointly taught with undergraduate students (ENLI10280)
KeywordsCSF
Contacts
Course organiserDr Alex Thomson
Tel: (0131 6)50 3058
Email: Alex.Thomson@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Kara McCormack
Tel: (0131 6)50 3030
Email: Kara.McCormack@ed.ac.uk
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