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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of History, Classics and Archaeology : Ancient History

Undergraduate Course: Macedonia from the Argeads to the Romans (ANHI10091)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of History, Classics and Archaeology CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 10 (Year 3 Undergraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryMacedonia, a contested region until today, was at the centre of world history at least three times: it was from here that Alexander the Great set out to conquer the world, it was here that the Romans first established a foothold in the Eastern Mediterranean, and it was here that the murderers of Caesar were defeated, paving the way for Augustus to transform Rome into a monarchy. This course studies the complex history and identity of the region from the fifth century BCE to the third century CE.
Course description The course introduces students to the history of the ancient region Macedonia, which covers modern day's Northern Greece, but also bits of Southern Bulgaria and the Republic of Macedonia. Conflicts surrounding the identity of the ancient Macedonians persist in the region even today; these modern debates will be addressed at the very beginning. The course then proceeds largely chronologically, starting with early Argead rule, then moving via Philip II and Alexander the Great - the most famous rulers of Macedonia - to the Hellenistic period. The last third of the course is dedicated to the Roman conquest of Macedonia, the reorganization of the territory as a Roman province, and the social and religious history of the region under Rome. While much emphasis necessarily has to be placed on political events, the course regularly includes weeks focusing on other topics such as questions of identity and language, education, social stratification and religion.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements This course is available to all students who have progressed to Honours.
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesVisiting students should usually have at least 3 courses in Classics, History or Archaeology (at least 1 of which should be in Ancient History) at grade B or above (or be predicted to obtain this) for entry to this course. We will only consider University/College level courses.
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2022/23, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  25
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 22, Summative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 172 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 40 %, Coursework 60 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Coursework: 4,500 word essay (60%)
Exam: 2 hour paper (40%)
Feedback Students will receive written feedback on their coursework, and will have the opportunity to discuss that feedback further with the Course Organiser during their published office hours or by appointment.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, command of the history of ancient Macedonia;
  2. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to read, analyse and reflect critically upon relevant scholarship and popular debates surrounding the topic;
  3. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, an ability to understand, evaluate and utilise a variety of primary source material;
  4. demonstrate, by way of coursework and examination as required, the ability to develop and sustain scholarly arguments in oral and written form, by formulating appropriate questions and utilising relevant evidence;
  5. demonstrate independence of mind and initiative; intellectual integrity and maturity; an ability to evaluate the work of others, including peers.
Reading List
E. Borza, In the Shadow of Olympus. The Emergence of Macedon, Princeton 1990.

E. Carney, King and Court in Ancient Macedonia, Swansea 2015.

A. M. Eckstein, Mediterranean Anarchy, Interstate War, and the Rise of Rome, Berkeley 2006.

R. M. Errington, A History of Macedonia, Berkeley 1990.

M. B. Hatzopoulos, Macedonian Institutions under the Kings (2 vols), Athens 1996.

C. J. King, Ancient Macedonia, London 2018.

R. J. Lane Fox (ed.), Brill's Companion to Ancient Macedon, Leiden 2011.

I. Worthington, By the Spear. Philip II, Alexander the Great, and the Rise and Fall of the Macedonian Empire, Oxford 2014.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Benedikt Eckhardt
Tel: (0131 6)50 9110
Email: B.Eckhardt@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Marketa Vejskalova
Tel:
Email: Marketa.Vejskalova2ed.ac.uk@ed.ac.uk
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