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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2022/2023

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Health in Social Science : Clinical Psychology

Postgraduate Course: Child Migration and Mental Health (Online) (CLPS11092)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Health in Social Science CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate)
Course typeOnline Distance Learning AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course provides an introduction to the key theories and concepts of development, psychopathology and social psychology within a migration context, and implications for policy and practice. Through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning activities (e.g., online lectures, tutorials, group work and discussions) the course offers students an opportunity to develop critical awareness and biopsychosocial understanding of the link between migration experiences and mental health outcomes in migrant children, asylum-seeking children and child refugees, and their families.

Course description International migration has increased over the past five decades, with an estimated total of 272 million migrants, including 79.5 million forcibly displaced people at the end of 2019 (UN IOM, 2020; UNHCR, 2021). The most recent global estimate of child migrants is approximately 31 million, and of these, 13 million are child refugees, 936,000 asylum-seeking children, and 17 million children who have been forcibly displaced inside their own country (UN IOM, 2020). It is well established that migration puts children at an increased risk of developing mental health problems due to exposure to adverse migration experience.

This course provides an introduction to the key theories and concepts of development, psychopathology and social psychology within a migration context, and implications for policy and practice. Through a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning activities (e.g., online lectures, tutorials, group work and discussions) the course offers students an opportunity to develop critical awareness and biopsychosocial understanding of the link between migration experiences and mental health outcomes in migrant children, asylum-seeking children and child refugees, and their families.

The course assumes a biopsychosocial approach to understanding and conceptualising mental health problems in the migration context of children and young people, and it will cover a multiplicity of themes that are divided into four components, including 1) developmental theories (e.g., psychosocial development theory, ecological systems theory, attachment theory) as a framework to conceptualise the complexities and influence of migration on human development; 2) psychological difficulties associated with migration experiences (e.g., common mental health problems, migratory mourning and stress); 3) social psychology theories to evaluate the influence of social and cultural factors (e.g. acculturation, identity development, group processes, discrimination, social networks) on migrant children's, asylum-seeking children's, and child refugees' mental health and wellbeing; and 4) culturally-sensitive clinical practice and policy development (e.g., housing, welfare, schooling, employment) and settlement policies. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to relevant child protection, and migration policies.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2022/23, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  None
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Seminar/Tutorial Hours 10, Online Activities 10, Formative Assessment Hours 2, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 174 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 70 %, Practical Exam 30 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Group presentation (30%)
Individual essay (70%) (3,500 words)
Feedback Formative assessment will take place in form of a group presentation that is linked to the first summative assessment, providing an opportunity for students to receive feedback on aspects of the summative assignments prior to the final assignment.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Students will be able to demonstrate a detailed and critical understanding of a biopsychosocial framework to conceptualise mental health outcomes in relation to migration experiences.
  2. Students will be able to demonstrate a critical and reflective understanding of theories and research relevant to migration experiences and mental health problems in migrant children, asylum-seeking children and child refugees and their families.
  3. Students will be able to demonstrate critical awareness and ability to apply biological, sociocultural and psychological factors on mental health problems and presentations in migrant children, asylum-seeking children and child refugees.
  4. Students will be able to demonstrate a critical and reflective awareness of risk and protective factors in migrant children, asylum-seeking children and child refugees presenting with mental health problems.
  5. Students will be able to critically reflect on clinical practice and its application to individual clinical presentations, and implication of other areas of practice and policy.
Reading List
Essential reading



Porter, M. (2007). Global evidence for a biopsychosocial understanding of refugee adaptation. Transcultural Psychiatry, 44, 418-439.



Motti-Stefanidi, F. (2018). Resilience among immigrant youth: The role of culture, development and acculturation. Developmental Review, 50, 99-109.



Rother, E. M., & Pumariega, A. J. (2020). Immigration, cultural identity and mental health. Psycho-social implications of the reshaoing of America. Oxford.



Song, S. J., & Ventevogel, P. (Eds.) (2020). Child, adolescent and family refugee mental health: A global perspective. Springer.



Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Knowledge and experience in understanding the impact of migration on young people and their families from a biopsychosocial perspective.

Ability to critically engage, appraise and apply key theories and concepts of migration at the intersection of developmental psychology, psychopathology, and social psychology

Advanced learning and study skills (e.g., working independently and in groups).

Oral and written communication skills (e.g., group discussions, presenting skills, essay).
KeywordsChild,family,migration,displacement,mobility,acculturation,mental health,wellbeing
Contacts
Course organiserDr Laura Cariola
Tel: (0131 6)51 4194
Email: laura.cariola@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Chelsea Kennedy
Tel: (0131 6)51 3969
Email: Chelsea.Kennedy@ed.ac.uk
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