THE UNIVERSITY of EDINBURGH

DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2022/2023

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : Moray House School of Education and Sport : Education

Undergraduate Course: Primary Studies 2: Learning and Integrating the Curriculum (EDUA08111)

Course Outline
SchoolMoray House School of Education and Sport CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 8 (Year 2 Undergraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThe course aims to provide students with the opportunity to explore the concept of progression in learning within disciplinary contexts and through the integrated curriculum. To develop their understanding of progression in learning within and across disciplines students will engage with lectures and workshops. Through the course students will also be introduced to approaches to integrating the curriculum (including interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary learning) and the associated practices in learning and teaching.
Course description The aim of the course is for students to develop knowledge and understanding of three main areas: progression in learning, 'the curriculum' and integrating the curriculum. These aims are set against a national and international context of significant and continuous curriculum reform. Therefore, it is important that student teachers consider what curriculum is, how it is constructed and how it supports the progression of learning. As they explore progression in learning students will begin to critique the concept of 'the curriculum' and consider this in relation to recent curriculum developments within Scotland, Curriculum for Excellence (Scottish Executive, 2006).

Building on learning from Primary Studies 1 on the nature of knowledge and curriculum students will look at progression of learning in each curricular area making use of the Curriculum for Excellence guidelines to explore this. In addition to drawing on concepts of disciplinarity, students will be supported to consider the concept of integrating the curriculum and what is meant by multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinarity approaches to teaching and learning in the primary context. Students will work towards an understanding of the ways in which multi, inter and trans disciplinarity can be used to support learners.

The course will be taught through lectures and workshops led by curriculum specialists and primary education specialists. Curriculum specialists will explore with students the ways in which their subjects lend themselves to interdisciplinarity in the classroom and the limitations and complexities of this. They will demonstrate the processes involved in planning, teaching assessing and evaluating stimulating, meaningful and appropriate learning within each discipline. Through the course assessments students will be able to apply their learning in a practical sense, firstly through analysis of video recordings of children's learning experiences. Secondly, to provide students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they have developed through the lectures and workshops in the second assignment they will have the opportunity to develop a curriculum plan which integrates the curriculum and considers progression in learning; students could make use of this plan on their Year 3 professional experience and practice.

Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements Please contact the course secretary before enrolling students on this course.
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2022/23, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  0
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Seminar/Tutorial Hours 20, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 156 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) Assessment 1: written assignment - 1000 words (mid semester) - 40% of course assessment

Using a writing frame provided students will record their understandings of progression in learning and how this links with assessment for, as and of learning. To inform their understanding the students will draw on the following:

relevant course reading;

reflections from professional experience and practice recorded on pebble pad;

observations of selected video and online material, and

professional dialogue emerging from lectures and workshops

This assessment component addresses the following Learning Outcomes:
Demonstrate understanding of how knowledge construction relates to learning and teaching in the primary context within each curriculum area.
Justify and evaluate teaching/learning approaches adopted in terms of coherence and progression for the learner.
Demonstrate an understanding of the uses of assessment for, of and as learning to inform planning for teaching and learning.

Assessment 2: Written Assignment - 2500 words (examination diet) - 60% of course assessment

The purpose of this assignment is to explore the concept of the integrated curriculum by reflecting on the strengths and limitations of this approach and then employing an integrated approach to devise an outline plan of possible teaching and learning experiences around the concept of interconnections and the theme of "Our Community".

This assessment component addresses the following Learning Outcomes:

Demonstrate understanding of how knowledge construction relates to learning and teaching in the primary context within each curriculum area.
Demonstrate understanding of theoretical underpinnings of models of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary learning.
Create a context for learning which draws on multi disciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary models of learning and their relationship to national policy.
Students are required to achieve an average of 40% over the two assessment components to achieve a pass.
Feedback Formative Assessment and Opportunities for Feedback:
The first assessment offers feed forward to assist the students in developing their integrated curriculum plan. Ahead of each assignment students will have the opportunity to engage in professional dialogue in relation to the assessment tasks. This will scaffold students' understanding of the assignment task and support them in planning for their proposed learning contexts.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate understanding of how knowledge construction relates to learning and teaching in the primary context within each curriculum area.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of theoretical underpinnings of models of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary learning.
  3. Create a context for learning which draws on multi disciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary models of learning and their relationship to national policy
  4. Justify and evaluate teaching/learning approaches adopted in terms of coherence and progression for the learner.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the uses of assessment for, of and as learning to inform planning for teaching and learning.
Reading List
Core Reading List:
Carrol, M. & McCulloch, M. ( 2014) Understanding Teaching and Learning in Primary Education. London: Sage
Drake, S. M. & Burns, R. C. (2004) Meeting Standards Through Integrated Curriculum. Virginia, USA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.
Hall, K & Burke, W. (2009) Making Formative Assessment work: Effective Practice in the Primary Classroom. Berkshire:OUP
Hickey, I. & Robson, D. (2012) The Leonardo Effect: Motivating Children To Achieve Through Interdisciplinary Learning. London: Routledge/David Fulton.


Curriculum Texts
De Vries , M., Custer, R., Dakers, J. & Martin G. (2007) Analysing Best Practices in Technology Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers
Firth, R. (2012) Disordering the coalition government's 'new' approach to curriculum design and knowledge: the matter of the discipline. Geography, 97 (2), pp. 86-94.
Hope G. (2008) Thinking and Learning Through Drawing in Primary Classrooms. London: Sage.
Overby, L. Y., Post, B. C., & Newman, D. (2005). Interdisciplinary learning through dance: 101 MOVEntures. Leeds: Human Kinetics.
Pickup, I. & Price, L. (2007) Teaching physical education in the primary school. A developmental approach. London: Continuum.
Swanwick, K. (2000) Music, Mind and Education. Routledge, London.
Taylor, P. (2000) The Drama Classroom; Action, Reflection, Transformation. London: Falmer.
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Undertake critical analysis and synthesis of ideas, concepts, information and issues that are within the common understandings of education.
Convey complex information to a range of audiences and for a range of purposes.
Work, under guidance, with others to acquire an understanding of current professional practice.
Exercise autonomy and initiative in some activities at a professional level in practice.
Keywordslearning,progression in learning,integrated curriculum,disciplinary,interdisciplinary
Contacts
Course organiserMiss Fiona Bowie
Tel: (0131 6)51 6429
Email: fiona.bowie@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMiss Lorraine Nolan
Tel: (0131 6)51 6571
Email: Lorraine.Nolan@ed.ac.uk
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