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DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2022/2023

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Social and Political Science : Postgrad (School of Social and Political Studies)

Postgraduate Course: Global Politics of Public Health (IPHP11003)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Social and Political Science CollegeCollege of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityAvailable to all students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course examines how health policy is increasingly being shaped beyond the level of the nation state. It offers a detailed examination of the institutions of global health politics, focusing on the emerging importance of international and supranational institutions and other global actors in the development of health policy. The course examines contemporary challenges confronting the World Health Organization, the influence of organisations created to promote trade and the increased involvement of non-state actors in health policy, and the course addresses the expanded roles of the commercial sector and civil society.
Course description This course examines the recent transformation in global health governance, exploring the implications of the proliferation of new actors and emergent challenges for the process and content of health policy.
Health policy is increasingly influenced by organisations that have been created to promote trade and development. The course specifically examines the expanded role of these international agencies and non-state actors in health policy, mainly the commercial sector and civil society, and the implications of the recent profusion of global health initiatives such as the Global Fund against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and philanthropic foundations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. These actors are examined alongside an examination of contemporary challenges confronting the World Health Organization, discussing initiatives like the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, the revised International Health Regulations and ongoing reform efforts as responses to the changing context of global health.

Aim: to examine how global health governance and health policy is increasingly being shaped beyond the level of the nation state, focusing on the changing roles of international organizations, the commercial sector and civil society.
This course examines how the process and content of health policy are being transformed by the powers and policy instruments of international and supranational institutions, new global actors, and new so-called 'emerging economies' such as the BRICS and CIVETS. The course examines contemporary challenges confronting the World Health Organization, discussing the extent to which recent innovations like the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and the revised International Health Regulations embody a new mode of global health governance.
Health policy is increasingly influenced by organisations that have been created to promote trade, and their significance is considered alongside detailed assessments of the involvement of the World Bank and the World Trade Organization. There has been increased involvement of non-state actors in health policy, and the module addresses the expanded roles of the commercial sector and civil society and the implications of the recent profusion of global health partnerships such as the Global Fund against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization.
This course will enable students to:
- Explore the implications of increased institutional pluralism within global health, mapping changes associated with the rise of key new actors
- Critically examine challenges confronting the World Health Organization in fulfilling its mandate and assess recent attempts at institutional and policy reform
- Assess the increasing significance of the commercial sector and civil society in global health policy
- Critically examine challenges to promoting policy coherence across global health, development and trade agenda
- Review global partnerships between public and private sectors in the context of new initiatives to combat infectious disease and NCDs
- Develop a critical understanding of the politics and significance of gender in global health policy
- Critically appraise key initiatives in global health governance, such as the rise of global health partnerships, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and consider proposals for reforming global health governance.

Outline Content

Unit 1: Introduction - Governing health in a globalized world: Changing role of the Stat
Unit 2: World Trade Organisation, Trade and policy coherence in global health
Unit 3: World Health Organisation: globalisation, crisis and change
Unit 4: World Bank, IFC and global health
UNIT 5: Commercial Sector and global health governance
Unit 6: Global health partnerships: philanthropy & the new global health
Unit 7: Civil society: addressing the democratic deficit in global health
Unit 8: Global politics of climate change and health: Appraising evidence and policy responses
Unit 9: Gender and Global Health Institutions
Unit 10: Reforming global health governance

The course is hands-on, taught through a combination of weekly lectures and seminars. All students are expected to take an active part in seminars, as this is a central part of the learning process. Seminars will use different formats, including group work and discussions, poster and oral presentations to peers, role-plays and debates. You will be expected to read in advance and participate in group work and contribute to wider class discussions.
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Information for Visiting Students
Pre-requisitesNone
High Demand Course? Yes
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2022/23, Available to all students (SV1) Quota:  71
Course Start Semester 2
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Lecture Hours 20, Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 176 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) The aim of the assessment is to allow you to demonstrate your ability to analyse relevant issues and core concepts and draw on and synthesise relevant evidence in response to the question.
This course will be assessed via a single written essay of no more than 4,000 words, and is worth 100% of the overall grade for this course. Essay titles and guidance will be distributed during the second half of the course.
Feedback Component 1: A 3,000 word written essay (70% of total mark), based on a selection of essay questions which change annually (to be submitted early in block 4)

Component 2: A Commentary reflecting upon either a key challenge in global health governance or a recent policy development (to be submitted at the end of block 4). This will be in line with submission requirements compiled from those of leading global health journals: maximum 1,000 words and no more than 12 references; using Vancouver referencing; and accompanied by a title and author page, a ┬┐What this paper argues┬┐ box containing a maximum of two bullet points, and a competing interests statement). Students will be encouraged to develop this jointly with a co-author, though will have the option of single authorship.

Formative assessment: students will give a brief conference-style presentation on the topic selected for their Commentary piece. This will take place during seminars in the latter half of semester 2, with oral feedback informing the development of the Commentary.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Explore the implications of increased institutional pluralism within global health, mapping changes associated with the rise of key new actors
  2. Critically assess the ability of the World Health Organization to fulfil its mandate
  3. Critically appraise key initiatives in global health governance, such as the rise of global health partnerships, the WHO Framework Convention on
  4. Critically assess the increasing significance of the commercial sector and civil society in global health policy
  5. Examine challenges to promoting policy coherence across global health, development and trade agendas
Reading List
None
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills Not entered
KeywordsNot entered
Contacts
Course organiserDr Kaveri Qureshi
Tel: (0131 6)51 1637
Email: kqureshi@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMrs Casey Behringer
Tel: (0131 6)50 2456
Email: Casey.behringer@ed.ac.uk
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