THE UNIVERSITY of EDINBURGH

DEGREE REGULATIONS & PROGRAMMES OF STUDY 2019/2020

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DRPS : Course Catalogue : School of Geosciences : Postgraduate Courses (School of GeoSciences)

Postgraduate Course: Applied Research Skills in Environment and Society (PGGE11255)

Course Outline
SchoolSchool of Geosciences CollegeCollege of Science and Engineering
Credit level (Normal year taken)SCQF Level 11 (Postgraduate) AvailabilityNot available to visiting students
SCQF Credits20 ECTS Credits10
SummaryThis course provides a Masters level introduction to the research approaches, skills and methods that underpin modern social and environmental sciences, with an emphasis on collecting and analysing data. Through a mixture of practicals, group work, lectures and discussion we will explore why and how we do science at the intersection of the social and natural sciences. The course covers methods for understanding everything from plots to people, from quadrants to qualitative data.
Course description This course provides a Masters level introduction to the research approaches, skills and methods that underpin modern social and environmental sciences, with an emphasis on collecting and analysing data. Through a mixture of practical┐s, group work, lectures and discussion we will explore why and how we do science at the intersection of the social and natural sciences.

The course covers methods for understanding everything from plots to people, from quadrats to qualitative data, and will help students prepare for dissertations or projects that involve data collection or analysis.

The course is structured around lectures followed by small group tutorials, a format which caters for students with very varied backgrounds. There is also a focus on getting your hands dirty, collecting and analysing your own data set, as well as working with other larger data sets.

The course is aimed at those with an undergraduate in either social or natural science. It is introductory in the sense that it assumes no prior experience of either, but quickly moves to Masters Level in both.

Wk 1: Intro to doing environmental and social sciences and How do we do science: 2 perspectives Wk 2: Research ethics and core concepts for quantitative research
Wk 3: Describing and visualising data
Wk 4: Mixed-Methods (ReHab: A game on trade-offs between Conservation and Livelihoods)
Wk 5: Introducing statistical models
Wk 6: Choosing a good model and avoiding common pitfalls
Wk 7: Planning qualitative research
Wk 8: Undertaking qualitative research
Wk 9: Collecting qualitative data
Wk 10: Analysing qualitative data
Wk 11: Qualitative and Quantitative methods in Action and course wrap up
Entry Requirements (not applicable to Visiting Students)
Pre-requisites Co-requisites
Prohibited Combinations Other requirements None
Course Delivery Information
Academic year 2019/20, Not available to visiting students (SS1) Quota:  40
Course Start Semester 1
Timetable Timetable
Learning and Teaching activities (Further Info) Total Hours: 200 ( Programme Level Learning and Teaching Hours 4, Directed Learning and Independent Learning Hours 196 )
Assessment (Further Info) Written Exam 0 %, Coursework 100 %, Practical Exam 0 %
Additional Information (Assessment) 100% Coursework

A1 Weekly blog post totalling 50% of the overall course mark. Set each Monday and due the following Friday at 12:00. Blogs involve reflecting on certain aspects of material in each week and completing a data analysis task using R and summarising and plotting your results.
Breakdown of weekly assessments:
Week 1 set Monday due Week 1 Friday ┐ not credit baring ┐ summative feedback to get up to speed.
Week 2 set Monday due Week 2 Friday ┐ 15%
Week 3 set Monday due week 3 Friday ┐ 20%
Week 4 set Monday due week 4 Friday ┐ 15%
Week 5 set Monday due week 6 Friday ┐ 50%
You will receive formative feedback on a weekly basis on your blog posts and a final summative grade will be provided once all blog posts have been completed.

A2 Qualitative research report and self-reflection Starts W9 due Monday W12 50%
For this assignment you will design and then execute a set of semi-structured interviews, and then learn how to code and analyse the resulting data. This will be written up as a research report, alongside a reflective log of your learning experience.
Feedback Students will be given formative feedback on weekly blog posts between Weeks 1 and 6, through small group discussions and practicals each week.

Summative feedback will be provided on the two assessments outlined below.
No Exam Information
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course, the student will be able to:
  1. Understand and appreciate that science is not value neutral, and that it is conducted for a variety of reasons and with different beliefs about reality
  2. Collect, record and organise qualitative and quantitative data
  3. Select and then undertake the appropriate type of analysis for a given dataset
  4. Report your results and analysis in a professional manner appropriate for your audience
Reading List
Overview reading:
The following resources provide an overview of the course and are important references that you will need to consult. There is additional required reading for each week see.

Quantitative methods:
Dalgaard, P. (2008). Introductory Statistics with R (2nd ed.). Springer New York. [Available electronically and in hard copy from the University library]
Greenland, S., Senn, S. J., Rothman, K. J., Carlin, J. B., Poole, C., Goodman, S. N., & Altman, D. G. (2016). Statistical tests, P values, confidence intervals, and power: a guide to misinterpretations. European Journal of Epidemiology, 31(4), 337350.

Qualitative approaches:
Flowerdew R. & Martin D. (eds) (1997) Methods in human geography. Pearson Prentice Hall. [e-book, library]

Required reading before each week:
Week 1
Evely A, et al. (2008) The Influence of Philosophical Perspectives in Integrative Research: a Conservation Case Study in the Cairngorms National Park. Ecology & Society, 13(2), 52.

Pickett, S.T.A., Kolasa, J. & Jones, C.G., 2007. Integration in Ecology. In Ecological Understanding: The Nature of Theory and the Theory of Nature. Elsevier, pp. 332. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780125545228500030

Week 2
Turner M.D. (2004) Political Ecology and the moral dimensions of resource conflicts: the case of farmer-herder conflicts in the Sahel. Political Geography, 23(7), 863-889.

Huxham, M. (2000). Science and the search for truth. Chapter 1 in, Huxham, M., and Sumner, D. (eds), Science and Environmental Decision-making, Pearson Educational Ltd., Harlow.

Rodrigues, A.S.L. et al., 2009. Boom-and-bust development patterns across the Amazon deforestation frontier. Science, 324(5933), pp.14357. [this is used in the class exercise, and reading this in advance will make life easier]

Week 3 Core concepts for quantitative research
Dalgaard (2008) Ch1-3.
Very important: please make sure you can use RStudio when you log in to the University managed desktop machines, or on your own laptop. For instruction on how to install and use Rstuido see: https://www.rstudio.com

Week 4 Describing and visualising data
Dalgaard (2008) Ch4.

Week 5 Introducing statistical models.
Dalgaard (2008) Ch5-6.

Week 6 Choosing a good model and avoiding common pitfalls.
Greenland, S., Senn, S. J., Rothman, K. J., Carlin, J. B., Poole, C., Goodman, S. N., & Altman, D. G. (2016). Statistical tests, P values, confidence intervals, and power: a guide to misinterpretations. European Journal of Epidemiology, 31(4), 337,350.

Week 7
Twyman C., Morrison J. & Sporton D. (1999) The final fifth: autobiography, reflexivity and interpretation in cross-cultural research. Area, 31(4), 313-325.

Week 8
Rocheleau D. (1995) Maps, Numbers, Text and Context: Mixing Methods in Feminist Political Ecology. Professional Geographer, 47(4), 458-466.

Week 9 (This week will be spent conducting fieldwork i.e. no class)

Week 10
Crang M. (2005) Analysing Qualitative Materials. In Flowerdew & Martin (Eds.) Methods in Human Geography. A guide for students doing a research project (2nd Edition)
Additional Information
Graduate Attributes and Skills The course allows students to develop their skills in undertaking qualitative and quantitative research, relevant to both the social and natural sciences.

You will develop skills in manipulating, summarising, visualising and analysing data, using the statistical software R, as well as developing your conceptual understanding of how statistics can be used to answer research questions.

You will also develop the skills to collect, analyse and visualise spatial data.

You will also develop skills in qualitative research: how to collect, analyse, code, and summarise data from semi-structured interviews, and how to assess data validity.

You will learn how to generalise from your sample / case study to wider relevance, using theory or statistics.

You will also learn how to mix quantitative and qualitative research methods, and how to report and write up research that spans both.

These skills are important for both undertaking research (e.g. as part of your dissertation or project, or a future PhD), and also provide important skills for those who need to utilise, synthesise or evaluate scientific research in a professional context.

Keywordsapplied research skills,environment,social sciences,quantitative,qualitative
Contacts
Course organiserDr Gary Watmough
Tel: (0131 6)51 4447
Email: Gary.Watmough@ed.ac.uk
Course secretaryMs Kathryn Will
Tel: (0131 6)50 2624
Email: Kath.Will@ed.ac.uk
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